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Line 308:

Burning burning burning burning

Eliot's Note:

308. The complete text of the Buddha's Fire Sermon (which corresponds in importance to the Sermon on the Mount) from which these words are taken, will be found translated in the late Henry Clarke Warren's Buddhism in Translation (Harvard Oriental Series). Mr. Warren was one of the great pioneers of Buddhist studies in the Occident.

Context:

The Fire Sermon describes the suffering intrinsic to the physical world as a fire that consumes both that world and the senses used to perceive it. To end suffering, the sermon teaches, one must recognize the depravity of these sensations and forsake them, ignoring the fleeting pleasures they provide.

Warren's translation of The Fire Sermon, from Buddhism in Translation:

Then The Blessed One, having dwelt in Uruvela as long as he wished, proceeded on his wanderings in the direction of Gaya Head, accompanied by a great congregation of priests, a thousand in number, who had all of them aforetime been monks with matted hair. And there in Gaya, on Gaya Head, The Blessed One dwelt, together with the thousand priests.


And there The Blessed One addressed the priests: —


“All things, O priests, are on fire. And what, O priests, are all these things which are on fire?


“The eye, O priests, is on fire; forms are on fire; eye-consciousness is on fire; impressions received by the eye are on fire; and whatever sensation, pleasant, unpleasant, or indifferent, originates in dependence on impressions received by the eye, that also is on fire.


“And with what are these on fire?


“With the fire of passions, say I, with the fire of hatred, with the fire of infatuation, with birth, old age, death, sorrow, lamentation, misery, grief, and despair are they on fire.


“The ear is on fire; sounds are on fire; ...the nose is on fire; odors are on fire; ...the tongue is on fire; tastes are on fire; ...the body is on fire; ideas are on fire; ...mind-consciousness is on fire; impressions received by the mind are on fire; and whatever sensation, pleasant, unpleasant, or indifferent, originates in dependence on impressions received by the mind, that also is on fire.


“And with what are these on fire?


“With the fire of passion, say I, with the fire of hatred, with the fire of lamentation; with birth, old age, death, sorrow, lamentation, misery, grief, and despair are they on fire.


“Perceiving this, O priests, the learned and noble disciple conceives an aversion for the eye, conceives an aversion for forms, conceives an aversion for eye-consciousness, conceives are aversion for the impressions received by the eye; and whatever sensation, pleasant, unpleasant, or indifferent, originates in dependence on impressions received by the eye, for that also he conceives an aversion. Conceives an aversion for the ear, conceives an aversion for sounds, ...conceives an aversion for the nose, conceives an aversion for odors, ...conceives an aversion for the tongue, conceives an aversion for tastes, ...conceives an aversion for the body, conceives an aversion for thing tangible, ...conceives an aversion for the mind, conceives an aversion for ideas, conceives an aversion for mind- consciousness, conceives an aversion for the impressions received by the mind; and whatever sensation, pleasant, unpleasant, or indifferent, originates in dependence on impressions received by the mind, for this also he conceives an aversion. And in conceiving this aversion, he becomes divested of passion, and by the absence of passion he becomes free, and when he is free he becomes aware that he is free; and he knows that rebirth is exhausted, that he has lived the holy life, that he has done what it behooved him to do, and that he is no more for this world.”


Now while this exposition was being delivered, the minds of the thousand priests became free from attachment and delivered from the depravities.


Here endeth the Fire Sermon